University of Mississippi

David Mills will be offering his one-man show, “David Mills: An Evening With Langston Hughes.” Feb. 18th, at 7p.m. Meek Auditorium

On Wednesday, February 18th at 7 PM, Brooklyn-based writer/performer David Mills will be offering his one-man show, “David Mills:  An Evening With Langston Hughes,” at the Meek Auditorium on the campus of the University of Mississippi.  The event is free and open to the public.  At the conclusion of his one-hour presentation, Mills will break character and dialogue with the audience about Hughes’s life and times.  For more information, please contact Dr. Adam Gussow, Department of English (agussow@olemiss.edu; 915-7333)

Dr. Heather Stur (U. Southern Mississippi) will be delivering a special guest lecture entitled “Women in the Vietnam War.” Thursday, February 12th at 7p.m. Bryant 209

Untitled.jpegOn Thursday, February 12th at 7pm, gender and Vietnam War historian Dr. Heather Stur (U. Southern Mississippi) will be delivering a special guest lecture talk on warfront images and portrayals of American and Vietnamese women who were on the front lines of the Vietnam War (1956-1975). Dr. Stur is the author of Beyond Combat: Women and Gender in the Vietnam War Era (Cambridge UP, 2011), a recent Fulbright Fellow (2013-2014; field research in Vietnam), and a fellow with the Dale Center for the Study of War and Society in Hattiesburg, MS. She is also an expert on the Cold War politics of the Asia Pacific region. Her interdisciplinary talk will be offered at 7pm in Bryant Hall 209 with a short reception and book sale to follow.

Heather Marie Stur, Ph.D. is associate professor of history at the University of Southern Mississippi, where she teaches courses on gender and war, U.S. foreign relations, the global Cold War, and the U.S. since 1945. Dr. Stur is a fellow in USM’s Dale Center for the Study of War & Society. She is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships, including a Fulbright Fellowship to Vietnam, where she spent the 2013-14 academic year as a visiting professor in the Faculty of International Relations at the University of Social Sciences and Humanities in Ho Chi Minh City. During her Fulbright year in Vietnam, Dr. Stur conducted research at Vietnam’s National Archives Branch II and the General Sciences Library in Ho Chi Minh City, where she read political and military documents, letters, newspapers, magazines, and other materials for several forthcoming projects about the Republic of Vietnam (a.k.a. South Vietnam). Her first book, Beyond Combat: Women and Gender in the Vietnam War Era, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2011, and she is the author of numerous articles, including “Hiding Behind the Humanitarian Label: Refugees, Repatriates, and the Rebuilding of America’s Benevolent Image after the Vietnam War,” in Diplomatic History; “In Service and in Protest: Black Women and the Impact of the Vietnam War on American Society,” in Soul Soldiers: African Americans and the Vietnam Era; “Perfume and Lipstick in the Boonies: Red Cross SRAO and the Vietnam War,” in The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics, and Culture; “Borderless Troubadour: Bob Dylan and the Music of the Cold War World,” in Highway 61 Revisited: Bob Dylan from Minnesota to the World; “The Women’s Army Corps Goes to Vietnam,” in America and the Vietnam War: Re-examining the Culture and History of a Generation; and “Finding Meaning in Manhood After the War: Gender and the Warrior Myth in Springsteen’s Vietnam War Songs,” in Dancing in the Dark: Bruce Springsteen, Cultural Studies, and the Runaway American Dream. Dr. Stur is currently working on two books, Saigon in the Sixties: Vietnamese, Americans, and the Culture of the Vietnam War and E-6 and the Coke Girl: A Story of Love Found and Lost in Vietnam. Dr. Stur is the director of USM’s Vietnam Summer Studies Program, a three-week study abroad trip in which students are immersed in Vietnamese history, politics, and culture. Dr. Stur holds a Ph.D. in history from the University of Wisconsin.

 

Works-in-Progress Seminar Series presents: Caroline Wigginton, Wednesday, November 19th 1:30-2:30pm.

Wigginton Website Image 2Assistant Professor Caroline Wigginton will present “Katherine Tekakwitha’s ‘Very Delicate Work’: Concealment, Display, and Communication in New France,” in the Hannah-Ford Room (Bondurant Hall 2nd Fl.) as part of the Fall 2014 Works-in-Progress Seminar Series.

The Works-in-Progress Seminar Series is open to all. The seminars consist of a twenty to thirty minute presentation followed by a Q & A discussion where feedback and further suggestions by both faculty and other graduate students are highly encouraged! For more information about this or other Works-in-Progress series events, please contact bcook1@go.olemiss.edu.

 

Jack Pendarvis will discuss writing for the Cartoon Network show “Adventures with Adventure Time.” Nov. 11th, at 7p.m. Overby Auditorium.

Jack Pendarvis: Adventures with Adventure Time.  Tues. Nov. 11, 7pm, Overby Auditorium.  Pendarvis, a writer for the Cartoon Network animated show Adventure Time, will show clips of episodes and discuss writing for the show.  The evening will be moderated by Bill Griffith, and is co-sponsored by Cinema and The Southern Documentary Project.

 

PendarvisPoster.Nov11 WP

Dr. Jay Watson will deliver annual Humanities Lecture entitled “William Faulkner on Speed: What the Humanities Can Teach Us about the Velocity and Tempo of Modern Life.” Nov. 3rd, at 7p.m. Bondurant Auditorium.

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Dr. Sharon Aronofsky Weltman will be giving a talk entitled “Performing Drood: Melodrama, Music Hall, and the Opium Dream Ballet.” Thursday, November 6th, at 3:30, in Bondurant Auditorium

imgresDr. Sharon Aronofsky Weltman (Department of English, LSU) will be giving a talk entitled “PerformingDrood: Melodrama, Music Hall, and the Opium Dream Ballet.”  The talk anticipates the production of the Musical Mystery of Edwin Drood (based on Charles Dickens’s unfinished novel) by our own Theatre Department at U of M.  Directed by Professor Amanda Wansa Morgan, the musical will run from Nov 13-15 (http://theatre.olemiss.edu/olemisstheatre.html ).  Dr. Weltman’s talk will even feature a live performance of a 19th century music-hall song by members of the Drood cast.

Dr. Weltman is the William E. “Bud” Davis Alumni Professor of English at Louisiana State University.  She  is a specialist in nineteenth-century British literature and culture and is author of Performing the Victorian: John Ruskin and Identity in Theater, Science, and Education (2007) and Ruskin’s Mythic Queen: Gender Subversion in Victorian Culture.  She recently published a scholarly edition of the never-before-published original version of the 1847 melodrama Sweeney Todd.  The lecture she will deliver is part of a book project entitled Victorians on Broadway, exploring the adaptation of Victorian materials for the 20th century American musical stage.  The book will include chapters on adaptations of Oliver Twist, Sweeny Todd, Jekyll and Hyde, Jane Eyre, and even Goblin Market.  Please feel free to invite your students, colleagues, and friends to what promises to be a fun, edifying, and lively experience.

Works-in-Progress Seminar Series presents: Erin Drew, Friday, October 31st 12-1p.m.

 

Drew pictureDue to an unforeseen scheduling conflict, Friday’s Works in Progress Seminar will feature Erin Drew reading from her current project entitled “‘Tis Prudence to prevent th’entire decay’: Usufruct, Sustainability, and Intergenerational Justice in the Eighteenth Century” in the Hannah-Ford Room (Bondurant Hall 2nd Fl.) as part of the Fall 2014 Works-in-Progress Seminar Series.

The Works-in-Progress Seminar Series is open to all. The seminars consist of a thirty-minute presentation followed by a Q & A discussion where feedback and further suggestions by both faculty and other graduate students are highly encouraged! For more information about this or other Works-in-Progress series events, please contact bcook1@go.olemiss.edu.

Dr. Allan Hepburn of McGill University will present a lecture entitled “Facing the Future: Children in Postwar Britain.” October 23, 4:00 p.m. Bondurant Auditorium.

img_2161On Thursday, October 23rd, at 4pm, in the Bondurant Auditorium, Dr. Allan Hepburn of McGill University will present a lecture entitled “Facing the Future: Children in Postwar Britain.” This talk will concentrate on British representations of children between 1945 and 1960 in relation to the discourse of the future that predominates in this period, and will draw on sources including Humphrey Jennings’ film A Diary for Timothy (1944-45) and the Labour Party’s 1945 platform, “Let Us Face the Future.” In focusing on postwar youth, novels and films of this period emphasize the alienation of children from their parents, their detachment from British history, and the reinforcement of duty in relation to Britain.

 

Allan Hepburn is James McGill Professor of Twentieth-Century Literature at McGill University. In addition to Intrigue: Espionage and Culture (2005) and Enchanted Objects: Visual Art in Contemporary Fiction (2010), he has published forty articles on various aspects of literature and culture. He edited three books of previously uncollected stories, essays, and broadcasts by Elizabeth Bowen. A fourth book, devoted to Bowen’s reviews, is forthcoming in 2015. He is currently writing a book about “Faith and British Culture, 1939-1962,” as well as a book about Elizabeth Bowen’s major fiction.

Professor Christopher Ricks of Boston University to give a paper entitled “T. S. Eliot and the South.” October 13, 6:00 p.m. Bondurant Auditorium.

08-1885/  OFFICE PORTRAIT CAS PROF. RICKS   / 6-19-08  KWZChristopher Ricks is the William M. and Sara B. Warren Professor of the Humanities at Boston University, having formerly been professor of English at Bristol and at Cambridge. He is a member of the Association of Literary Scholars, Critics, and Writers, of which he was president (2007-2008). He has edited and also teaches in the Core Curriculum. He was elected Professor of Poetry at Oxford in 2004, and is known both for his critical studies and for his editorial work. The latter includes The Poems of Tennyson (revised 1987), The New Oxford Book of Victorian Verse(1987), Inventions of the March Hare: Poems 1909-1917 by T. S. Eliot (1996), The Oxford Book of English Verse (1999), Selected Poems of James Henry (2002), Samuel Menashe’s New and Selected Poems (2005), Samuel Beckett’s The Expelled / The Calmative / The End / First Love (2009), Henry James’s What Maisie Knew (2010) and for Penguin Books Alfred Lord Tennyson: Selected Poems (2007). He is the author of Milton’s Grand Style (1963), Keats and Embarrassment (1974), The Force of Poetry (1984), T. S. Eliot and Prejudice (1988), Tennyson (1989), Beckett’s Dying Words(1993), Essays in Appreciation (1996), Allusion to the Poets (2002), Reviewery (2002), Decisions and Revisions in T. S. Eliot (2003), Dylan’s Visions of Sin (2004), and True Friendship: Geoffrey Hill, Anthony Hecht, and Robert Lowell under the Sign of Eliot and Pound (2010). He was Professor of Poetry at Oxford, 2004-2009; in 2010, Waywiser Press published his anthology Joining Music with Reason: 34 Poets, British and American, Oxford 2004-2009.

Kiese Laymon, 2015-2016 Grisham Writer in Residence, received prestigious Stanford University writing award.

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