University of Mississippi

Hubert Creekmore State Historical Marker Dedication, October 9th, 4p.m. Water Valley, Mississippi

UntitledPlease join us for the unveiling of the State Historical Marker dedicated to the life and work of Mississippi author Hubert Creekmore (1907 – 1966) on Friday, October 9th at 4p.m. in Water Valley, Mississippi.

4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Unveiling of the State Historical Marker at 114 Panola Street, the family home built by his father Hiram Hubert Creekmore around 1900.

5:00 – 6:30 p.m.

Reminiscences of Hubert Creekmore and

Reading from his Work at Bozarts Gallery at 403 N. Main St.

Refreshments served.

This program brings together family members, scholars, readers, archivists, students and all those who care about preserving and recovering Mississippi’s literary heritage. The program features recitations of poems from four published collections of his poetry, a reading from each of his three novels including The Welcome, a novel set in Water Valley, as well as readings, commentary, and overviews of his numerous translations of literature from Latin and his non-fictional work.   Also on view will be paintings on loan by the family, photography, and various editions of his books as well as a facsimile exhibition of letters and material items pertaining to his life curated by Dr. Jennifer Ford, head of Special Collections at the J.D. Williams Library at the University of Mississippi.

This event is free and open to the public. Please direct inquiries to Dr. Annette Trefzer or 662-473-2484, or Mr. Mickey Howley: 662-473-6767.

Beth Ann Fennelly Awarded Fall 2015 Orlando Creative Nonfiction Prize

See the full story here.

UM Program Transforms Incarcerated Men into College Students

See the story here.


Literary Death Match Tuesday, Oct. 13th at 7p.m. at The Powerhouse.

Death Match

The Edith Baine Lecture Series presents: “Toward a Sustainable Humanities” by Stephanie LeMenager. Sept. 17th at 7p.m. The Depot

imgresStephanie LeMenager is the Barbara and Carlisle Moore Professor of English and Professor of Environmental Studies at the University of Oregon. Her publications include the books Living Oil: Petroleum Culture in the American Century, Manifest and Other Destinies, and (as co-editor) Environmental Criticism for the Twenty-First Century. Her forthcoming books are Weathering: Toward a Sustainable Humanities and the collection Teaching Climate Change in the Humanities with co-editors Stephen Siperstein and Shane Hall. She is a founding editor of Resilience: A Journal of the Environmental Humanities.

The Lecture will take place on September 17th at 7p.m at The Depot.  This event is free and open to the public.

Mission Statement
The Edith T. Baine Lecture Series for Scholars and Writers invites the best and brightest scholars and writers to our campus. The Baine lecturers and writers are chosen on the basis of energetic and engaged scholarship and creative work, innovative approaches, and dynamic presentation styles. The lectures showcase paradigm-shifting research and groundbreaking writing. The visiting scholars and writers are intended to expose undergraduates to the fullness of a life deeply engaged in literature while inspiring graduate students to pursue ambitious work.

Edith T. Baine
Mrs. Edith Turley Baine of El Dorado was born November 29, 1945 in Greenville, Mississippi, the daughter of Edith Waits Turley and George Turley. She graduated from Leland High School and the University of Mississippi, where she received B.A.E. and M.A.E. degrees. Mrs. Baine was a member of the First Presbyterian Church of El Dorado, El Dorado Service League, Phi Mu Sorority and Delta Theta Phi Law Fraternity International. She was a former member of the Board of Directors of the Union County Humane Society. She was an El Dorado Jaycettes and later became an El Dorado Jaycee. She was a tree farmer and retired English teacher who taught in Mississippi and at El Dorado High School. On April 13, 2012, Mrs. Baine passed away at Baptist Health Medical Center in Little Rock. Her generous gift to the English Department at the University of Mississippi supports this lecture series and promotes academic and creative exchange.

Fisher-Wirth Chosen as Fellow of Black Earth Institute

AnnfisherworthAnn Fisher-Wirth, professor of English and director of the environmental studies program at the University of Mississippi, has been chosen as a fellow of the Black Earth Institute, a think tank of artists and scholars devoted to serving environmental and social causes with their art.

“I am very pleased to be chosen as a fellow for the Black Earth Institute,” Fisher-Wirth said. “It is a big honor and a wonderful validation of my work as a poet and environmental activist. It reflects on the support I have been given at the University of Mississippi, both as a member of the English department and as director of the minor in environmental studies.”

Fisher-Wirth was among seven, chosen from nearly 100 applicants, selected for the fellowship.

“Ann Fisher-Wirth has a reputation for being a strong environmentalist both in her professional and personal life,” said Ivo Kamps, chair of the UM Department of English. “Her commitment to leaving our planet a place our children and grandchildren can hope to enjoy is evident in her poetry and her teaching.”

Many of the courses within the English department that focus on literature and the environment are available to students because of Fisher-Wirth, he said.

“As director of the environmental studies minor, she continues to bring in many speakers and organizes events that expose our students to one of the most pressing issues of our time,” Kamps said. “Her selection as a fellow of the Black Earth Institute is a recognition of the important work she has done, is doing and will do in the future.”

Fellows are chosen every three years. Fisher-Wirth’s fellowship is a three-year term from July 1, 2015 to July 1, 2018. The aim of the fellowship is to collaborate with other fellows and promote awareness of the Black Earth Institute’s mission.

Each year, the selected fellows gather in Black Earth, Wisconsin, with founder Michael McDermott and several former fellows and scholars to discuss social justice and environmental topics and share their individual experiences. Fellows also take turns editing special issues of the institute’s online journal, About Place.

UM to Honor First Doctoral Recipient in English

A1ihTwZRSBL-200x300Kenneth Holditch slated to present lecture at annual Faulkner conference.  Click HERE for the full story.

Doctoral Students Win Prestigious Fellowships

Brian Cook and Helen Davies will study medieval literature this summer in Britain.  See the full story here.

Winners of 2015 Creative Writing Awards Announced!

Evans Harrington Scholarship/Judge Blair Hobbs:  Madeline Krema for “Pan American Dreams”
Ella Somerville Award for Poetry/Judge Blair Hobbs:  Christina Fullenkamp for “Zydrate Comes in a Little Glass Vial”
Ella Somerville Award for Fiction/Judge Bill Cusumano:  Valencia Lloyd for “Hair Pick”
Bondurant Prize for Poetry/Judge Beth Spencer:  Molly Brown for “Self Portrait As Everything I’m Not”
Bondurant Prize for Fiction/Judge Melissa Ginsburg:  Kate Sparks for “Fast Car”
Congratulations to our winners!


The Forty-Third James Edwin Savage Lecture in the Renaissance: “Is the Early in Early Modern the same as Early in Early Colonial?” by Ania Loomba. April 16th at 7p.m. Bondurant Auditorium

Ania Loomba001Ania Loomba is Professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania.  She received her BA (Hons.), M. A., and M. Phil. degrees from the University of Delhi, India, and her Ph. D. from the University of Sussex, UK. She researches and teaches early modern literature, histories of race and colonialism, postcolonial studies, feminist theory, and contemporary Indian literature and culture. She currently holds the Catherine Bryson Chair in the English department. She is also faculty in Comparative Literature, South Asian Studies, and Women’s Studies, and her courses are regularly cross-listed with these programs.

Her writings include Gender, Race, Renaissance Drama (Manchester University Press; 1989; Oxford University Press, 1992), Colonialism/ Postcolonialism (Routledge, 1998; second edition, 2005; with Italian, Turkish, Japanese, Swedish and Indonesian editions) and Shakespeare, Race, and Colonialism (Oxford University Press, 2002). She has co-edited Post-colonial Shakespeares (Routledge, 1998); Postcolonial Studies and Beyond (Duke University Press, 2005), and Race in Early Modern England: A Documentary Companion (Palgrave, 2007). She is series editor (with David Johnson of the Open University, UK) of Postcolonial Literary Studies (Edinburgh University Press).

Her latest publications are a collection of essays South Asian Feminisms (co-edited with Ritty A. Lukose, Duke University Press, 2012) [] and a critical edition of Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra (Norton, 2011) []

She is currently working on the lives of left-wing Indian women of the 1940s and 1950s, and co-editing (with Melissa Sanchez) Rethinking Feminism: Gender, Race and Sexuality in the Early Modern World.

The lecture will take place on April 16 at 7:00 p.m. in the Bondurant Auditorium.