University of Mississippi

UM Liberal Arts Graduate Programs Jump in Rankings: English, History and Political Science doctoral programs named among nation’s best

OXFORD, Miss. – On the heels of achieving the university’s highest-ever standing in the 2017 U.S. News & World Report annual rankings of Best (Undergraduate) Colleges and Universities, the publication’s most recent graduate academic program rankings confirm the university’s commitment to academic excellence.

Doctoral programs in English, history and political science all made significant strides in the 2018 graduate program rankings, indication of the growing strength and upward trend for UM’s graduate programs in social sciences and humanities.

The U.S. News & World Report graduate rankings for the three programs were last updated in 2013.

“We are proud of the faculty who have worked hard to distinguish our graduate programs, and these new rankings clearly indicate that they are gaining recognition for their efforts,” said Noel Wilkin, UM interim provost and executive vice chancellor. “We have encouraged each of our programs to pursue excellence and I am pleased that this pursuit is bringing recognition to our faculty, our university and our state.”

The English doctoral program demonstrated the biggest jump as it improved 16 spots, where it tied for No. 40 in the nation among public universities with fellow Southeastern Conference institutions the universities of Florida and Missouri.

A Ph.D. in history from the university has never been more valued, as the graduate program cracked the Top 40 for the first time. UM tied for No. 37 in the category – up nine spots from 2013 – and shares the position with fellow SEC and Carnegie R1 research universities Texas A&M and Kentucky.

The political science graduate program entered the rankings for the first time and tied for No. 58 among public institutions.

Lee Cohen, dean of the College of Liberal Arts, says the rankings are a testament to the university’s strong faculty, staff and students.

“These rankings demonstrate what we have believed for some time: that we have strong, competitive doctoral programs on our campus that are well-respected at the national level,” Cohen said. “Of course, without the hard work of our faculty, staff and students, and the support of university administration, none of this would be attainable.”

The rankings are based on data collected last fall via surveys sent to administrators or faculty members at schools that granted five or more doctorates in each discipline from 2011 to 2015.

“Graduate education is increasingly important and valued in today’s competitive global marketplace,” Chancellor Jeffrey Vitter said. “A UM graduate degree marks someone as a leader who will exceed employer expectations and be a real-world change maker.

“In order to continue the rise of our graduate programs, we are committed to enhancing our R1 standing as well as faculty excellence, research and scholarship.”

http://english.olemiss.edu/2017/03/22/4119/

Hubert Creekmore State Historical Marker Dedication, October 9th, 4p.m. Water Valley, Mississippi

UntitledPlease join us for the unveiling of the State Historical Marker dedicated to the life and work of Mississippi author Hubert Creekmore (1907 – 1966) on Friday, October 9th at 4p.m. in Water Valley, Mississippi.

4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Unveiling of the State Historical Marker at 114 Panola Street, the family home built by his father Hiram Hubert Creekmore around 1900.

5:00 – 6:30 p.m.

Reminiscences of Hubert Creekmore and

Reading from his Work at Bozarts Gallery at 403 N. Main St.

Refreshments served.

This program brings together family members, scholars, readers, archivists, students and all those who care about preserving and recovering Mississippi’s literary heritage. The program features recitations of poems from four published collections of his poetry, a reading from each of his three novels including The Welcome, a novel set in Water Valley, as well as readings, commentary, and overviews of his numerous translations of literature from Latin and his non-fictional work.   Also on view will be paintings on loan by the family, photography, and various editions of his books as well as a facsimile exhibition of letters and material items pertaining to his life curated by Dr. Jennifer Ford, head of Special Collections at the J.D. Williams Library at the University of Mississippi.

This event is free and open to the public. Please direct inquiries to Dr. Annette Trefzer atrefzer@olemiss.edu or 662-473-2484, or Mr. Mickey Howley: 662-473-6767.

Literary Death Match Tuesday, Oct. 13th at 7p.m. at The Powerhouse.

Death Match

The Forty-Third James Edwin Savage Lecture in the Renaissance: “Is the Early in Early Modern the same as Early in Early Colonial?” by Ania Loomba. April 16th at 7p.m. Bondurant Auditorium

Ania Loomba001Ania Loomba is Professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania.  She received her BA (Hons.), M. A., and M. Phil. degrees from the University of Delhi, India, and her Ph. D. from the University of Sussex, UK. She researches and teaches early modern literature, histories of race and colonialism, postcolonial studies, feminist theory, and contemporary Indian literature and culture. She currently holds the Catherine Bryson Chair in the English department. She is also faculty in Comparative Literature, South Asian Studies, and Women’s Studies, and her courses are regularly cross-listed with these programs.

Her writings include Gender, Race, Renaissance Drama (Manchester University Press; 1989; Oxford University Press, 1992), Colonialism/ Postcolonialism (Routledge, 1998; second edition, 2005; with Italian, Turkish, Japanese, Swedish and Indonesian editions) and Shakespeare, Race, and Colonialism (Oxford University Press, 2002). She has co-edited Post-colonial Shakespeares (Routledge, 1998); Postcolonial Studies and Beyond (Duke University Press, 2005), and Race in Early Modern England: A Documentary Companion (Palgrave, 2007). She is series editor (with David Johnson of the Open University, UK) of Postcolonial Literary Studies (Edinburgh University Press).

Her latest publications are a collection of essays South Asian Feminisms (co-edited with Ritty A. Lukose, Duke University Press, 2012) [http://southasianfeminisms.wordpress.com/] and a critical edition of Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra (Norton, 2011) [http://books.wwnorton.com/books/Antony-and-Cleopatra/]

She is currently working on the lives of left-wing Indian women of the 1940s and 1950s, and co-editing (with Melissa Sanchez) Rethinking Feminism: Gender, Race and Sexuality in the Early Modern World.

The lecture will take place on April 16 at 7:00 p.m. in the Bondurant Auditorium.

 

The Edith Baine Lecture Series presents: “The Wild Not Less Than the Good: Thoreau, Sex, Biopower.” March 26th at 7p.m. The Depot

Coviello Bio ImagePeter Coviello is Professor of English at the University of Illinois-Chicago. He received his BA from Northwestern University in 1993, and his MA and PhD from Cornell. From 1998 to 2014 he taught at Bowdoin College, where he served as Chair of the departments of English, Africana Studies, and Gay and Lesbian Studies. He is the editor of Walt Whitman’s Memoranda During the War (Oxford 2004) and the author of Intimacy in America: Dreams of Affiliation in Antebellum Literature (Minnesota 2005) and of Tomorrow’s Parties: Sex and the Untimely in Nineteenth-Century America (NYU 2013), a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award in LGBT Studies. With Jared Hickman he co-edited a 2014 special issue of American Literature entitled “After the Postsecular.”

He has written about Walt Whitman, the history of sexuality, queer children, 18th- and 19th-century American literature, Mormon polygamy, stepparenthood, pop music, and much besides. This work has appeared in PMLA, American Literature, ELH, GLQ, and Raritan, as well as in venues like the LA Review of Books, Avidly, Frieze, and The Believer.

The Lecture will take place on March 26th at 7p.m at The Depot.  This event is free and open to the public.

Mission Statement
The Edith T. Baine Lecture Series for Scholars and Writers invites the best and brightest scholars and writers to our campus. The Baine lecturers and writers are chosen on the basis of energetic and engaged scholarship and creative work, innovative approaches, and dynamic presentation styles. The lectures showcase paradigm-shifting research and groundbreaking writing. The visiting scholars and writers are intended to expose undergraduates to the fullness of a life deeply engaged in literature while inspiring graduate students to pursue ambitious work.

Edith T. Baine
Mrs. Edith Turley Baine of El Dorado was born November 29, 1945 in Greenville, Mississippi, the daughter of Edith Waits Turley and George Turley. She graduated from Leland High School and the University of Mississippi, where she received B.A.E. and M.A.E. degrees. Mrs. Baine was a member of the First Presbyterian Church of El Dorado, El Dorado Service League, Phi Mu Sorority and Delta Theta Phi Law Fraternity International. She was a former member of the Board of Directors of the Union County Humane Society. She was an El Dorado Jaycettes and later became an El Dorado Jaycee. She was a tree farmer and retired English teacher who taught in Mississippi and at El Dorado High School. On April 13, 2012, Mrs. Baine passed away at Baptist Health Medical Center in Little Rock. Her generous gift to the English Department at the University of Mississippi supports this lecture series and promotes academic and creative exchange.

Professor Leonard Cassuto of Fordham University will give a talk entitled, “Man Up, Man Down: The Past and Present of American Toughness.” Wednesday, March 18, at 6:00 p.m. in Brevard 134

imgresLeonard Cassuto is Professor of English at Fordham University, where he has taught since 1989.  He is the author or editor of numerous volumes including The Inhuman Race:  The Racial Grotesque in American Literature and Culture, Hard Boiled Sentimentality: The Secret History of American Crime Stories, The Cambridge History of the American Novel, and The Cambridge Companion to Baseball.  His latest manuscript, “The Graduate School Mess,” is under contract at Harvard University Press, and he writes a monthly column, “The Graduate Adviser,” for the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Panel with Former MFAs: M.O. Walsh, Alex Taylor, and Jacob Rubin “From There to Here: 3 Recent MFAs Share their Routes to Publication.” Friday, March 20 from 3-4pm in the Hannah-Ford Room for Writers

Panel with Former MFAs: M.O. Walsh, Alex Taylor, and Jacob Rubin “From There to Here: 3 Recent MFAs Share their Routes to Publication.”  It is open to current MFAs/other interested parties, Friday, March 20 from 3-4pm in the Hannah-Ford Room for Writers (Bondurant C208).  After the panel, these three authors will be reading and signing their books at 5pm at Square Books – March 20th.

Julie Beth Napolin, assistant professor of Digital Humanities at Eugene Lang College, the New School, will give a talk entitled “Minor Sound: Toward a Philosophy of Circumambience in Faulkner.” Wednesday, March 4, at 6:00 p.m. in Bishop Hall 209

static1.squarespaceProfessor Napolin, who received her Ph.D. in Rhetoric from the University of California in 2010, works at the interface of modernist studies, new media studies, sound studies, critical theory, and American literature and music.  Her work is included in the essay collections Vibratory Modernism and the forthcoming Fifty Years after Faulkner, and she is currently at work on two book-length studies, The Fact of Resonance: Toward a Literary Sound Studies and Dialectical Sound: Archiving Sonic Memory.  Recent conference presentations and articles have focused on the work of Conrad, Faulkner, Du Bois, Eisenstein, and Benjamin.  She has also served as associate director of the Digital Yoknapatawpha digital humanities project at the University of Virginia.  Many thanks in advance for helping Professor Napolin feel welcome on our campus next month.

Gordon Marino’s talk entitled “Seven, Eight, or Nine Upbuilding Lessons that I Have Taken from Søren Kierkegaard,” has been rescheduled for today at 2 PM in the Hannah-Ford Room of Bondurant.

MarinoGordon300x3501Dr. Gordon Marino, Professor of Philosophy at St. Olaf College (Northfield, MN), will give a talk entitled “Seven, Eight, or Nine Upbuilding Lessons that I Have Taken from Søren Kierkegaard” Today, February 27 at 2:00 PM in Bondurant 208C. In addition to courses on the Danish philosopher, he also teaches the history of philosophy and philosophy of religion, and serves as Curator of the Howard V. and Edna H. Hong Kierkegaard Library. He received his PhD from University of Chicago, an MA from University of Pennsylvania, and his BA from Columbia University.

An insightful public intellectual, he has published articles in American Poetry Review, Atlantic Monthly, and New York Times Magazine. He is author of Kierkegaard in the Present Age and editor of The Quotable Kierkegaard, one of The Wall Street Journal Bookshelf Best Books of 2013.

Dr. Amy Clukey of University of Louisville will give a talk entitled “Monsters of Whiteness: White Zombie and Plantation Horror.” Monday, March 2 at 4:00 in Bishop 103

UnknownAmy Clukey, a former Ole Miss undergraduate and now an assistant professor at the University of Louisville, will give a talk entitled “Monsters of Whiteness: White Zombie and Plantation Horror” Monday, March 2 at 4:00 in Bishop 103.  Amy was a double major in English and Southern Studies with a minor in Gender Studies and she was in the honors college.

Amy Clukey is assistant professor of English at the University of Louisville. Prior to this appointment, she was an ACLS New Faculty Fellow at Columbia University and a dissertation fellow with the Center for American Literary Studies at the Pennsylvania State University, where she received her Ph.D. in 2009. She teaches courses on transnational literature, global modernism, and southern studies. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in The New Hibernia Review, Modern Fiction Studies, American Literature, and Twentieth-Century Literature, among other venues. Her article “Plantation Modernity: Gone with the Wind and Irish-Southern Culture” was awarded the Louis D. Rubin, Jr. Prize for the best article on southern literature published in 2013 by the Society for the Study of Southern Literature. She is currently completing a monograph entitled Plantation Modernism: Transatlantic Anglophone Fiction 1890-1950.

At Ole Miss, Clukey was double major in English and Southern Studies with a gender studies minor, and an honors scholar. She was president of the Lafayette-Oxford-University chapter of the National Organization for Women, a member of the Isom Undergraduate Committee that organized Sarahfest concerts for rape crisis, served as a student representative on the Sarah Isom Center steering committee, and had a feminist column in the Daily Mississippian. She was also a work-study study at the Isom center for a year and before that at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture. She received the Gray award for outstanding undergraduate work in southern studies in 2002 and the Georgia Nix undergraduate activism award from the Isom center in 2003.