University of Mississippi

Reading for the Body

Jay Watson argues that southern literary studies has been over-idealized and dominated by intellectual history for too long.  In Reading for the Body, he calls for the field to be rematerialized and grounded in an awareness of the human body as the site where ideas, including ideas about the U.S. South itself, ultimately happen.

Employing theoretical approaches to the body developed by thinkers such as Karl Marx, Colette Guillaumin, Elaine Scarry, and Friedrich Kittler, Waston also draws on histories of bodily representation to mine a century of southern fiction for its insights into problems that have preoccupied the region and nation alike: slavery, Jim Crow, and white supremacy; the marginalization of women; the impact of modernization; the issue of cultural authority and leadership; and the legacy of the Vietnam War.  He focuses on the specific bodily attributes of hand, voice, and blood and the deeply embodied experiences of pain, illness, pregnancy, and war to offer new readings of a distinguished group of literary artists who turned their attention to the South: Mark Twain, Jean Toomer, Zora Neale Hurston, William Faulkner, Richard Wright, Katherine Anne Porter, Bobbie Ann Mason, and Walker Percy.

 

 

Sample faculty post

Fantasy Fiction Students and Instructor Beth Spencer

Beth Ann Fennelly has been awarded a CIEE Fellowship

Professor Beth Ann Fennelly has been awarded a CIEE Fellowship to attend a seminar entitled “After the Celtic Tiger: Politics and Sociology in Ireland.” Learn more about the seminar and the Council on International Educational Exchange at their website.

Pushcart Prize Nominations

M.F.A. Alumni Danielle Sellers, Chris Hayes, Alicia Casey and Chrissy Davis were each nominated for a Pushcart Prize this year. Check here for more information on the annually published Pushcart Anthology.

Checklist for Minors

Composition (6 hours)

  • WRIT 100 or WRIT 101_____
  • WRIT 102 or LIBA 102_____

200-level Survey Courses (6 hours)

  • ENGL 221 World Lit to 1650_____
  • ENGL 222 World Lit since 1650_____
  • ENGL 223 American Lit to the Civil War_____
  • ENGL 224 American Lit since the Civil War_____
  • ENGL 225 British Lit from the Beginning through the 18th Century_____
  • ENGL 226 British Lit from the 18th Century to the present_____

(Note: ENGL 250 does not count toward a minor in English!)

300/400/500-level Courses (9 hours)

  • _____
  • _____
  • _____

Checklist for Bachelor of Arts Degree in English

Composition (6 hours)

  • Writ 100 _______ or Writ 101 ________ AND Writ 102____ or LIBA 102 ___

200-level Survey Courses (6 hours)

  • ENGL 221 World Lit to 1650 _____
  • ENGL 222 World Lit since 1650 _____
  • ENGL 223 American Lit to the Civil War _____
  • ENGL 224 American Lit since the Civil War _____
  • ENGL 225 British Lit from the Beginning through the 18th Century_____
  • ENGL 226 British Lit from the 18th Century through the present_____

300-level Seminars (6 hours)

  • ENGL 390 (Junior Seminar: Major Authors of British Lit)_____
  • ENGL 391 (Junior Seminar: Major Authors in American Lit)_____
  • ENGL 392 (Junior Seminar: Major Authors in World Lit)_____
  • ENGL 396 (Junior Seminar: Drama)_____
  • ENGL 397 (Junior Seminar: Poetry)_____
  • ENGL 398 (Junior Seminar: Literary Criticism)_____
Shakespeare (3 hours)
  • ENGL 385_____
Additional English Courses

In addition to the above requirements, students must take four classes at the 400 or 500 level and three classes at the 300 level or above. One of these electives must be in literature before 1800.
One of these electives must also be a capstone course.

English Electives: 12 hours at the 400 or 500 level:

  • _____
  • _____
  • _____

English Electives: 9 hours at the 300 level or above:

  • _____
  • _____
  • _____

Notes
3 hours of 200-level courses are prerequisites for all courses 300-level and above.
Up to 15 hours of writing courses (including WRIT 100 or 101 and either WRIT 102 or LIBA 102) may count toward the major.
In lieu of one or two courses during the senior year, a student may take the Senior Thesis (ENGL 499) for 3 or 6 hours of credit (must have a 3.5 or above).
124 hours total for a B.A., with a C average (2.0) in all coursework; 42 semester hours total, consisting of 30 hours at the 300-level and above, in addition to the 12 hours of 100- and 200-level courses required by the College of Liberal Arts.

 

MINOR
Usually 18 hours in a Department other than English.

 

CLEP CREDIT
Receiving CLEP credit requires the approval of the Dean of Liberal Arts and the Center for Writing and Rhetoric Director. Students who earn a minimum score of 50 on the English composition exam (50 questions and essay) will receive credit for WRIT 100 or WRIT 101.

M.F.A. Poets and Professor Ann Fisher-Wirth

Graduate Students

Adetayo Alabi, Associate Professor of English