University of Mississippi

3MT Presentation Samyak Shertok, Grand Prize Winner!

Dustin Parsons

Dustin Parsons is the author of Exploded View: Essays on Fatherhood, with Diagrams. He has previously served as the non-fiction editor of The Mid-American Review. Awards for his writing include an Ohio Arts Grant and a New York Fine Arts grant in creative non-fiction, the 2013 American Literary Review Prize in fiction, the 2014 fiction prize from The Laurel Review and a notable mention in the 2014 Best American Essays. He was awarded a residency fellowship at Wyoming’s Brush Creek Foundation of the Arts and the Vermont Studio Center.

Publications:

Exploded View: Essays on Fatherhood, with Diagrams. University of Georgia Press, 2018.

Education:

  • M.F.A. Fiction: Bowling Green State University (2001)
  • M.A. Literature: Kansas State University (1999)

Awards:

  • New York Fine Arts Grant, 2011. Creative Nonfiction
  • Ohio Arts Grant, 2005. Creative Nonfiction
  • American Literary Review Fiction Award (2013)
  • Laurel Review Fiction Award (2014)

Ole Miss Professor and Mississippi Poet Laureate Beth Ann Fennelly is the featured guest on MPB

Mississippi Public Broadcasting featured guest Beth Ann Fennelly

 

 

 

 

Aimee Nezhukumatathil’s OCEANIC: Poetry + Beauty with Copper Canyon Press

AIMEE NEZHUKUMATATHIL reads "In Praise of My Manicure"

“Because I was taught all my life to blend in, I want / my fingernails to blend out”AIMEE NEZHUKUMATATHIL reads “In Praise of My Manicure” from her new book, OCEANIC – one of the spring titles readers like you can help bring to life with your support: kck.st/2hjqE9R

Posted by Copper Canyon Press on Wednesday, November 8, 2017

“Poetry offers an attention to the world, to beauty, and to love. I think that’s a form of activism: inviting people in this hurting world to see animals and nature and human relationships differently, and to take refuge in beauty.” 

—Aimee Nezhukumatathil, author of OCEANIC

 

Aimee Nezhukumatathil, author of OCEANIC

Here’s what Aimee says about working with Copper Canyon:

“For over twenty years I’ve eagerly read books from Copper Canyon Press — my bookshelf is full of well-worn and dog-eared favorites. They’ve ushered in a stunning array of diverse voices throughout the years and I’m truly honored they are about to publish my latest collection.

I’ve been reading Copper Canyon books since I first started studying poetry. I learned about voice from C.D. Wright; the quiet loveliness of staying with an image from W.S. Merwin; and fierce fire from Lucille Clifton. OCEANIC will be the first book of mine to appear with that iconic pressmark.”

Aimee was born in Chicago to a Filipina mother and a father from South India. She is the author of three previous collections of poetry. She has served as returning faculty at Kundiman, the Asian American Writers’ Retreat, and with Ross Gay, she co-authored the chapbook, Lace & Pyrite: Letters from Two Gardens. Awards for her writing include a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Pushcart Prize, and being selected as the 2016-17 John and Renée Grisham Writer-in-Residence. Aimee is poetry editor of Orion Magazine, widely recognized as one of America’s leading environmental magazines. Her collection of nature essays is forthcoming from Milkweed. She is professor of English in the University of Mississippi’s MFA program.

Internship Opportunities with the University of Mississippi Press

Please click on the links below to view internship opportunities with the University of Mississippi Press.

Editorial Internship
 
The McRae Publishing Internship

Beth Ann Fennelly, Heating and Cooling: 32 Micro Memoirs

Beth Ann Fennelly will be reading from her memoirs on October 10, Off Square Books, at 5:00 p.m.

 

Paula W. White

                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Education:
      Ph.D. English, University of Arkansas, 2017.               
      M.A. English, Jackson State University, 2010.
      B.A., with Distinction, English, Jackson State University, 2007.
 
Teaching and Research Interests: 
      African American Literature
      Black Feminist Literary Studies
      Contemporary Southern Literature
      
Publications: 
     “Individualism and the Pull of Tradition in Things Fall Apart and The Joys of Motherhood” in Achebe’s Women: Imagism and Power African Press, 2012: 301-08. Print.
      White Faces in Black Spaces: The Dilemma of William Styron’s Nat Turner” in Black Magnolias: A Literary Journal. (Vol. 6.1)  Spring 2012: 5-16. Print.
 
Courses:
      African American Literature Survey to 1920
     African American Literature Survey since 1920
      Major African Authors
      Special Topics in Gender and Literature
       Southern Literature
     
    

Julian Randall, MFA student, awarded Cave Canem Poetry Prize

Cave Canem Poetry Prize

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Launched in 1999 with Rita Dove’s selection of Natasha Trethewey’s Domestic Work, this first-book award is dedicated to the discovery of exceptional manuscripts by black poets of African descent. View previous Prize Winning Books.

Submissions for the 2018 Cave Canem Poetry Prize will open in spring 2018.

2017 Winner

Cave Canem is pleased to announce that Vievee Francis has selected Julian Randall’s manuscript, Refuse, for the 2017 Cave Canem Poetry Prize. Julian will receive $1,000, publication by The University of Pittsburgh Press in fall 2018, complimentary copies of the book and a feature reading in New York City.

Julian Randall is a Living Queer Black poet from Chicago. A Pushcart Prize nominee, he has received fellowships from Callaloo, BOAAT and the Watering Hole and was the 2015 National College Slam (CUPSI) Best Poet. Julian is the curator of Winter Tangerine Review’s Lineage of Mirrors and a poetry editor for Freezeray Magazine. He is also a co-founder of the Afrolatinx poetry collective Piel Cafe. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in publications such as NepantlaRattleNinth LetterVinylPrairie Schooner and The Adroit Journal among others. He is an MFA candidate in poetry at the University of Mississippi.

Honorable Mentions:

Darrel Alejandro Holnes for Stepmotherland
Shayla Lawson for Ti Ador(n)o

Funder: National Endowment for the Arts

Ralph Eubanks to Serve as Visiting Professor at UM

Alumnus and author will teach courses in Southern studies and English

Ralph Eubanks

OXFORD, Miss. – Author and journalist Ralph Eubanks returns to the University of Mississippi this fall, this time as a visiting professor. The Mount Olive native will teach a Southern studies course this fall and an English course during the spring semester.

His Southern studies course, SST 598: Special Topics, examines the American South through the art of photography as well as through the work of writers who have found their inspiration in photography. James Agee and Walker Evans’ “Let Us Now Praise Famous Men” will serve as a foundational work to examine ways the visual record of the American South is tied to writing about the region, including novels, poetry and journalism, particularly magazine journalism of the 1960s in magazines such as Life and Look.

What connects the reading for this course – and will be the focus of class discussions – is how authors turn to photographs as a way to tie together the region’s visual and verbal traditions, Eubanks said.

“I spoke at the center last year about the work of Walker Evans and James Agee and the impact it was having on my own writing about the Mississippi Delta,” he said. “At the time, I was teaching a class of photography and literature at Millsaps College, but I realized at the end of the class that I spent a great deal of time focused on the South.

“So when I was asked to teach at Ole Miss, I decided to adapt that class to focus exclusively on the South.”

Eubanks said he hopes students will learn how history is embedded in visual images, as well as how to read a photograph.

“Photographs are time capsules of history and can tell us a great deal about how the people and places captured in them,” Eubanks said. “Also, I hope they will see how photographs can be a testament to the relentless melting of time.

“As Susan Sontag said, all photographs are ‘memento mori’ (a Latin phrase meaning ‘remember that you have to die’). A photograph captures another person’s – or a place’s – mortality, vulnerability and mutability.

“I’d like my students to think about how the visual image of the South has evolved over time and reveals time’s impact on the landscape as well as how visual images both crush – and reinforce – Southern myths.”

Second-year Southern studies master’s student Holly Robinson enrolled in the course because she thought it would be a good way to brush up on her image-analysis skills ahead of her thesis research.

“I’m a popular culturist, so I enjoy looking at visual imagery more than books because there’s a lot more to say about an image, and things aren’t as concrete, so you can be really speculative in your analysis, which always leads you to a more interesting idea-place,” Robinson said.

Eubanks’ class for the English department is “Civil Rights and Activism in Literature,” which is slightly different from a class he taught at Millsaps. It will examine works of literature that turn their focus on the image, life and reality of black life during the civil rights movement as well as in today’s second wave of activism.

“One change this time is that I am teaching Richard Wright’s ‘Native Son,’” Eubanks said. “I believe that Richard Wright’s work, particularly the social realism of his work, deserves a re-examination.”

Eubanks is the author of “Ever Is a Long Time: A Journey Into Mississippi’s Dark Past” (Basic Books, 2003), which Washington Post book critic Jonathan Yardley named as one of the best nonfiction books of the year. He has contributed articles to the Washington Post Outlook and Style sections, the Chicago Tribune, Preservation and National Public Radio.

He is a recipient of a 2007 Guggenheim Fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation and has been a fellow at the New America Foundation. He is the former editor of the Virginia Quarterly Review at the University of Virginia and served as director of publishing at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. from 1995 to 2013.

Last year, he was the Eudora Welty Visiting Scholar in Southern Studies at Millsaps College in Jackson.

Eubanks, who received his bachelor’s degree at UM before earning a master’s degree in English language and literature at the University of Michigan, is looking forward to spending an extended amount of time on the Ole Miss campus.

“Although I spend a great deal of time in Oxford, it is different being a resident of the university community and being a visitor,” he said. “I’m looking forward to being a part of the community for a while.

“Plus, this academic year is exactly 40 years after my senior year at Ole Miss, which was the last time I spent an extended amount of time on campus. It’s good to come full circle.”

Ralph Eubanks

Ralph Eubanks is the author of The House at the End of the Road:  The Story of Three Generations of an Interracial Family in the American South (HarperCollins, 2009) and Ever Is a Long Time: A Journey Into Mississippi’s Dark Past (Basic Books, 2003), which Washington Post book critic Jonathan Yardley named as one of the best nonfiction books of the year. He has contributed articles to the Washington Post Outlook and Style sections, the Chicago Tribune, Preservation and National Public Radio.  He is a recipient of a 2007 Guggenheim Fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation and has been a fellow at the New America Foundation. He is the former editor of the Virginia Quarterly Review at the University of Virginia and served as director of publishing at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. from 1995 to 2013.